This is What Female Leadership Looks Like! by Vicki Noble

 

Continue reading “This is What Female Leadership Looks Like! by Vicki Noble”

The Heraklion Museum: A Critique of the Neolithic Display by Carol P. Christ

If I had been asked to write the words that introduce visitors to the Heraklion Archaeological Museum of Crete to its earliest inhabitants, I would have said something like this:

While there is evidence that human beings visited Crete as early as 150,000 years ago, the first permanent settlers arrived from Anatolia in the New Stone Age or Neolithic era, about 9000 years ago, bringing with them the secrets of agriculture and soon afterward learning the techniques of pottery and weaving. As the gatherers of fruits, nuts, and vegetables and as preparers of food in earlier Old Stone Age or Paleolithic cultures, women would have noticed that seeds dropped at a campsite might sprout into plants. Women most likely discovered the secrets of agriculture that enabled people to settle down in the first farming communities of the New Stone Age. As pottery is associated with women’s work of food storage and preparation, and as weaving is women’s work in most traditional cultures, women probably invented these new technologies as well. Each of these inventions was understood to be a mystery of transformation: seed to plant to harvested crop; clay to snake coil to fired pot; wool or flax to thread to spun cloth. The mysteries were passed on from mother to daughter through songs, stories, and rituals. Continue reading “The Heraklion Museum: A Critique of the Neolithic Display by Carol P. Christ”

She Who Has Faith in the Unknown by Jassy Watson

Jassy_Agora1-150x150I am sharing the following story, that with a few recent alterations, I wrote as a university paper last year in a course on Ancient Religions. It is significant for me presently because it is a year almost to the day that I embarked on Carol Christ’s Goddess Pilgrimage to Crete. Seeds of transformation were planted on Greece, therefore naturally I have been reflecting and reminiscing not only on my Odyssey, but also on the full circle I have come since.

Today, from my hometown of Delphi, I will make pilgrimage to the Temple of Apollo. I will make this journey alone for I seek answers to questions of a personal nature. I have waited patiently through the cold and barren days of winter, even coming summer and autumn past, failing to see the Pythia with each visit, for during these times of uncertainty the Temple has been busy with representatives from many cities. All recognise the importance of Apollo as a mediator of disputes and a champion of law and stability. Everyday concerns like mine are least important compared to those matters of war and men. I come however, not seeking answers from Apollo, but rather from our great mother Gaia, for all know that it is she who has resided here since the beginning. I feel it in my heart that I will be heard today, for spring has arrived, and concerns over battle have been put aside for the festival ‘Theophania’, a celebration of Apollo’s return. The countryside is bursting with new life, the sky is clear and the womb of the great mother is abundant; I sense blessings for a brighter future. Continue reading “She Who Has Faith in the Unknown by Jassy Watson”

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