Imagine. A Relationship. by Karen Leslie Hernandez

Imagine.
A relationship.
So painful.
So needed.
Never.
What it needs.
To be.
Yet the
Desire.
For what.
For what.
Imagine.
A relationship
That’s not.
Doesn’t exist.
Isn’t.
A relationship
That strives
To go.
No where.
A relationship
Of fear.
Regret.
A grave.
Of nothing.
Imagine.
Never having.
Peace.
Honesty.
Truth.
Love.
But instead.
Loss.
Grief.
Emptiness.
A vacuum.
Imagine.
Needing.
Safety.
Craving
Life.
Time.
Needing.
The pain
To end.
Imagine.
Life.
Without.
Those who cause
Harm.
Detriment.
Yet.
Somehow.
Love
You.
As only
They can.
And it must
Be enough.
It is.
Enough.
Imagine.
Feeling.
Love
Born.
From birth.
Not from
Nurture.
Not from
Care.
From duty.
Deep seeded
Love.
Exists.
If only
Deep.
In a soul.
Felt only
Because.
Of Birth.
Innate.
Not from
Returned
Love.
Or acceptance.
Imagine.
The time
When.
Those
Who cause
Harm.
Are gone.
Will it be
More
Empty.
Void.
Cavernous.
Or.
Relief
With sorrow.
For what
Never was.
Never could have
Been.
Never had.
Needed.
Never.
Had.
Wanted.
Imagine.
A relationship.
Without words.
That
Hurt.
Sting
Create hatred.
Of self.
Of them.
Imagine.
Actions that
Show desire.
To see.
You.
To know.
You.
Imagine.
A relationship.
With
Them.
Old.
Mean.
Decrepit.
Ill.
Sick.
Blood.
A relationship
With one.
Who isn’t
Likable.
Yet somehow
Lovable.
Imagine.
How
It feels.
To love.
To hate.
Have anger.
Despair.
At what
Is.
Was.
Will be.
Never.
Never.
Without
Pain.
Always.
With sorrow.
Always.
Always.
With question.
Why.
Why.
Why don’t you.
Stop.
Hurting.
And instead.
Love.
Me.
Love me.
Just love.
Me.
Imagine.
A relationship.
That boasts.
I am broken.
I am broken.
I was broken
At birth.
As you are.
And have been
Broken.
Can we be.
Broken.
Together.
Imagine.
A relationship.
Karen Leslie Hernandez is a theologian and interfaith activist. She has published with several media outlets including the Women’s United Nations Report Network, The Journal of Inter-Religious Dialogue/Studies, the Interfaith Observer, and she is the only Christian to have published an ongoing Op-Ed Column with OnIslam out of Cairo, Egypt. Some of her past gigs include designing and teaching an Interfaith Dialogue workshop with Meadville Lombard Theological School in Chicago, as well as spending three years working with United Religions Initiative, in several different positions. An Over-Achiever, Karen has not one, but two theological master’s degrees – one from Andover Newton Theological School, the other from Boston University School of Theology. She did her BA at Wellesley College, graduating with honors in her major, Peace and Justice Studies, where she wrote her thesis on Al Qaeda and their misuse religion for political gain. Karen currently lives in California, works at two faith based non-profits, teaches workshops throughout the Bay Area, is pursuing a Doctor of Ministry degree at Claremont School of Theology, and she is also a certified domestic violence advocate.

Can You Imagine a Society of Peace? by Carol P. Christ

Carol Molivos by Andrea Sarris 2As war and the fruits of war, including hatred and the desire for vengeance, threaten our human community, I take this opportunity republish a vision of a Society of Peace. If we cannot imagine a Society of Peace, we will never be able to create one. Can you imagine that:

As a child, you would not have to fight with your sisters or brothers for your father’s or your mother’s attention. You would not have one mother but many as you would be raised in a large extended family. Both girls and boys would be equally loved and cherished by their mothers and grandmothers and by their uncles and great-uncles. Both girls and boys would know that they would always have a place in the maternal clan. As a boy or a girl you would never have to “separate from” or “reject” your mother in order to “prove yourself as an individual” or in order to “grow up.” You could grow up without severing the bond with the ones who first loved you and first cared for you.

You would be raised in a large family with sisters and brothers and cousins, all of whom you would consider your siblings. You would never feel lonely. You would not be taught to compete with your siblings. You would never be hit by or hit others, because violent behaviors would not be considered appropriate in families. Continue reading “Can You Imagine a Society of Peace? by Carol P. Christ”

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