Green Tara by Jassy Watson


JassyGoddess Tara is one of the oldest goddesses who is still worshipped extensively in modern times. Tara originated as a Hindu goddess, a Great Goddess or Mother Creator, she who represents the eternal life force that fuels all life. In Sanskrit, the name Tara means Star, but she was also called The Great Compassionate Mother and The Great Protectress.

A version of the Goddess Tara exists in most cultures. It is believed that she will assume as many forms on earth as she is needed by the people.

Adopted by Buddhism in the third century BCE, Tara came to be the most widely revered deity in the Tibetan pantheon. Not only is she a Tibetan Goddess, but she is considered a female Buddha; an enlightened one was has attained the highest wisdom, capability and compassion. One who is able to take  human form and remain at one with every living thing.

The Celts called their Great Goddess Tara. Her name is thought to be the root of the word Tor, which is a mound of earth or hill imbued with spiritual energy or connection to the other worlds.

Her name is also echoed in the Latin word Terra, meaning earth; yet another connection between Tara and the idea of a “Mother Earth”.

The Goddess Tara is also associated with Kuan Yin, the great Chinese goddess of mercy compassion who is also another manifestation of Divine Mother.

There are many embodiments of Tara, but the best known are the White and Green Tara.

Green Tara is known for the activity of compassion. She is the consort of the Dhyani Buddha Amogasiddhi, and is incarnated in all good women. White Tara is also known for compassion, long life, healing and serenity. Red Tara is the fierce aspect associated with magnetizing all good things. While Black Tara is associated with power and Yellow Tara with wealth and prosperity.

In her numerous incarnations the goddess Tara has many gifts to share with modern women. She is an embodiment of the feminine strengths of deep care and compassion. She can offer support during stressful moments, helps to overcome obstacles and is a constant source of sustenance and protection. She is here to remind us of our “oneness” with all of creation and the importance of nurturing the spirit within.

My following painting of Green Tara is embodied as “Mother Earth”, she holds the earth gently and compassionately in her hands. New growth in the form of a tea leaf sprouts from the earth with the sacred red thread extending from the roots and into her hair which flows to her garment becoming the ocean – source of life. For me, she is a reminder to BE compassion and at one with the earth. She also came as a guide of peace and love on my continuing journey of transformation.

Om Shanti

I send peace for all human kind, peace for all living and non living beings, peace for the universe, peace for each and every thing in this whole cosmic manifestation.

Green Tara by Jassy Watson

Green Tara by Jassy Watson

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Categories: General

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8 replies

  1. Beautiful image, Jassy. Would you like to consider an exhibition in Springwood, NSW?

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  2. Thank you for this Jassy. I am busy on an extensive body of work on Mary Magdalene, paintings and drawings… among other things. I am sistering Tara and Magdalene as goddesses of compassion… I interpret Magdalene’s tears as those of compassion for the suffering of her beloved, rather than ascribing her tears to repentance for sins… I also associate Magdalene’s legendary 30 year sojourn in her grotto as her intimate connection with Earth… Anna Fedele in her marvelous book, “Looking for Mary Magdalene: Alternative Pilgrimage and Ritual Creativity at Catholic Shrines in France”, tells of how the pilgrims in her study made offerings of their menstrual blood to the earth at the legendary grotto at Ste Baume… this sacred earth
    … Your painting is beautiful.

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  3. Your goddess paintings are beautiful and rich with symbolism, and make an important contribution at FAR. Thanks so much for sharing, Jassy.

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  4. For you my dear!! ox

    Choose love. It’s easy.

    >

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  5. I was dedicated to the Green and White Taras in the late 1980s when I spent a weekend with a group of WASP Tibetans (normal Americans who were already dedicated to Tara and Tibetan practices) in Brentwood, California, under the leadership of Dagmola Jamyang Sakya, whose family had been the first to leave Tibet when the Chinese invaded ca.1950. What was remarkable about that weekend is that I was the only Pagan in the room, the only person interested more in the goddess herself than in Tibetan meditation. Did anyone care? Not at all. I was totally welcome. It was a beautiful weekend in a beautiful setting, and I still chant the Tara mantra–Om Tare Tutare Ture Soha. I have a friend who is very ill, and from time to time I chant the mantra and wrap her in the goddess’s light. It’s helping keep her alive. (She told me she’s not ready to go yet.) Tara can, of course, also be ferocious when ferocity is necessary.

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  6. She looks so content. Beautiful. Thank you for sharing. (love the hair turning into water, and the lace of her dupatta getting wave-foamy and cloudish at the same time).

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    • I had to look up “dupetta” — interesting —and I didn’t see the waterfalll until you mentioned it — thanks always, dear nmr, for your insights here at FAR I have to go away for a while, wish me good speed, thanks!

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  7. Serene, and powerful, picture Jassy. We have a Buddhist monk of the Bon Tradition who lives “up the road”. I like the feeling in the pictures on his website.
    http://www.sherabchammaling.com/

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