All Hallows Tide in Old Lancashire by Mary Sharratt


 

My 2010 video docudrama about the Pendle Witches. Fun fact: my Welsh pony makes a guest appearance here.

 

Come Halloween, the popular imagination turns to witches. Especially in Pendle Witch Country where I have lived since 2002. This rugged Pennine landscape surrounding Pendle Hill was once home to twelve individuals arrested for witchcraft in 1612. The most notorious was Elizabeth Southerns, alias Old Demdike, cunning woman of long-standing repute and the heroine of my novel Daughters of the Witching Hill.

How did these historical cunning folk celebrate All Hallows Eve?

All Hallows has its roots in the ancient feast of Samhain, which marked the end of the pastoral year and was considered particularly numinous, a time when the faery folk and the spirits of the dead roved abroad. Many of these beliefs were preserved in the Christian feast of All Hallows, which had developed into a spectacular affair by the late Middle Ages, with church bells ringing all night to comfort the souls thought to be in purgatory. Did this custom have its origin in much older rites of ancestor veneration? This threshold feast opening the season of cold and darkness allowed people to confront their deepest fears—that of death and what lay beyond. And their deepest longings—reunion with their cherished departed.

After the Reformation, these old Catholic rites were outlawed, resulting in one of the longest struggles waged by Protestant reformers against any of the traditional ecclesiastical rituals. Lay people stubbornly continued to hold vigils for their dead—a rite that could be performed without a priest and in cover of darkness. Until the early 19th century in the Lancashire parish of Whalley, some families still gathered at midnight upon All Hallows Eve. One person held a large bunch of burning straw on a pitchfork while the others knelt in a circle and prayed for their beloved dead until the flames burned out.

 

                                                           Pendle Hill in autumn

 

Long after the Reformation, people persisted in giving round oatcakes, called Soul-Mass Cakes to soulers, the poor who went door to door singing Souling Songs as they begged for alms on the Feast of All Souls, November 2. Each cake eaten represented a soul released from purgatory, a mystical communion with the dead.

In Glossographia, published in 1674, Thomas Blount writes:

All Souls Day, November 2d: the custom of Soul Mass cakes, which are a kind of oat cakes, that some of the richer sorts in Lancashire and Herefordshire (among the Papists there) use still to give the poor upon this day; and they, in retribution of their charity, hold themselves obliged to say this old couplet:

                    God have your soul,

                    Bones and all.

Other All Hallows folk rituals invoked the power of fire to purify and ward. In the Fylde district of Lancashire, farmers circled their fields with burning straw on the point of a fork to protect the coming crop from noxious weeds.

Fire was used to protect people from perceived evil spirits active on this night. At Longridge Fell in Lancashire, very close to Pendle Hill, the custom of ‘lating’ or hindering witches endured until the early 19th century. On All Hallows Eve, people walked up hillsides between 11 pm and midnight. Each person carried a lighted candle and if the flame went out, it was taken as a sign that an attack by a witch was impending and that the appropriate charms must be employed to protect oneself.

What do these old traditions mean to us today?

All Hallows is not just a date on the calendar, but the entire tide, or season, in which we celebrate ancestral memory and commemorate our dead. This is also the season of storytelling, of re-membering the past. The veil between the seen and unseen grows thin and we may dream true.

Wishing a blessed All Hallows Tide to all!

 

 

Source: Ronald Hutton, The Stations of the Sun: A History of the Ritual Year in Britain

Why not try out this Soul Cake Recipe while listening to this traditional Souling Song?

 

Mary Sharratt is an American writer living in the Pendle region of Lancashire, Northern England. She is on a mission to write overlooked women back into history. Her acclaimed novel of the Pendle Witches, Daughters of the Witching Hill, is out in paperback and ebook. Her latest novel, Ecstasy, is drawn from the dramatic life of composer and life artist, Alma Mahler. Visit Mary’s website.   

 

 

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8 replies

  1. An enjoyable docudrama! I’m sorry it was so short!

    Like

  2. informative, evocative post. I love Daughters of Witching Hill and recommend it to FAR readers!

    Like

  3. THE DAUGHTERS OF WITCHING HILL was such an enchanting, fascinating tale, a tale from long ago with an echo in today. Thank you!

    Like

  4. Well done, Mary! and I liked your pony too!
    Thank you!

    Like

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  1. All Hallows Tide in Old Lancashire by Mary Sharratt — – Wolf and Raven

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