St. Brigid to Brigid of Danu By Anne Fricke


AnneOh, bright flame of the dawn, You,

who came before me and still breathe into the forge,

whisper into the ears of poets, long after my bones

have ground into dust upon the earth, I held your place

 

claimed it for my own—but what choice did I have?

Patrick had arrived, cast his fire atop the Hill of Slaine

brought my God to your people

 

But you were fading already, your son’s deceit

bleeding tradition onto the battlefield, the blood of matriarchal

death seeping into the soil to find underground waterways

You taught the women a way to mourn, cried your grief

into the air—weeping and shrieking from your loss, our

loss, onto the soul of this land

 

gave them power to lament—if that is any consolation

for your loss—the beginning of the end

for the Old Ways, I tried to honor you well, held your place

 

with dignity, performed miracles in salvation of the poor

and women in desperation, founded schools of art, metalwork,

illumination, some even say I rescued my God’s son,

 

wrapped the infant in my mantle and fled

beneath the shadows of Herrod’s slaughter

I saved a son, as you could not save your own

 

We kept your fires lit, guarded by women of worship

Are the details of who important? Our name travels across lands

spoken on lips in unison with end-of-winter’s hope

 

The people remember. Are we so different?

a Goddess and a Saint—one is to be revered, the other

devotes her life in reverence, perhaps…perhaps I am

 

but a glimmer of your existence, But still, I have tried

to honor you well, the fires of your creation remain lit, Your well calls

them home, and whether it is You they seek, or I,

 

the people still come to us to pray.

 

Anne Fricke is a poet, author, storyteller, podcast host, wife, and mother. She lives in far Northern California, writes daily, and travels when she can. Raised by a strong, outspoken, agnostic mother in the Bible Belt, Anne was gratefully able to find her way to the Divine Feminine as a young woman, with little baggage attached.You can read more of her work at annefricke.com.



Categories: General

Tags:

9 replies

  1. Lovely. I only recently learnt that Patrick was an English slave. Fascinating poem.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. A beautiful evocation of Brigid. It reminds me of the dilemma so many of us face as we seek to be true to ourselves in a society that does not value female divinity and the necessities that entails while still holding our own sacredness within.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. The Old Ways live on – not just in our hearts and in our imagination but also in the arms of the Soul and Body of Nature – I hold this truth in hope that someday this power will once again illuminate the world.

    Liked by 4 people

  4. Such a true poem! We need to hear from the strong women, from goddesses who have been demoted and dismissed. (Not to mention demonized.) Let them–and us–be strong again. Many thanks for writing this. Reading it first thing this morning has inspired me. Bright blessings to you and your work.

    Liked by 3 people

  5. Such a beautiful invocation/evocation of goddess and saint. Brigid goddess of smith craft, poetry, and healing lives on in your poem.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. What a wonderful evocation of Brigid, the goddess, and Bridget, the saint. I enjoyed visiting Brigid’s well while in Ireland. It was nice to see the photos of that spot

    Like

  7. Thank you for this, Anne. Brigid has been tugging at my cloak more and more lately, and this feels like yet another sign from her. Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. This poem is both bittersweet & lovely to me.

    Like

Trackbacks

  1. St. Brigid to Brigid of Danu By Anne Fricke — – MY FAITH-BLOG

Please familiarize yourself with our Comment Policy before posting.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: