PENTECOST a time to FILL THE WORLD WITH SPIRIT by Mary Jane Miller


Pentecost is followed by Ordinary time, the longest season of the church year. It gives us plenty of time to think about what happened when the Holy Spirit descended on the Apostles. I have always loved the idea that this one moment changed us, it was and is the fulfillment of God’s promise to pour out the Holy Spirit on all flesh, empowering diverse people to exercise divine power. It is commonly understood that the first to receive the power from on high are the male disciples, “locked in a closed room for fear of persecution.” Apparently these Jewish disciples were not too worried about their wives and children.

After painting several Pentecost Feast Day icons as an artist, iconographer and child of God I cannot remain silent with what I think the icon has taught me. It feels obvious that the great gift of the Holy Spirit was for all of humanity. I want to commemorate an ongoing Pentecost, a time to fill the world with spirit, where women and children are invited into the closed room and given a rightful place at the table. Images have a great deal of influence in opening the heart and the mind. Imagine a new contemporary understanding of divine light touching all human beings as well as the planet.

The Spirit Descending

A half circle of twelve descending rays is commonly found at the top of any Pentecost icon. This representation is critically important for the beginning of our narrative. “Then there appeared to them divided tongues, as of fire, and one sat upon each of them.  And they were all filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak with other tongues, as the Spirit gave them utterance. (Acts 2:2-4)

Imagine that these rays represent the uncreated energies filling the universe, the same rays any of us might feel when touched by grace. These divine rays envelope us as they come from beyond time and space.

The Apostles Sitting

In the middle of the Pentecost icon we see the twelve Apostles sitting in a half circle in perfect harmony.  This reflects the historic Day of Pentecost. When the Day of Pentecost had fully come, they were brought to one accord in one place.

One important means of understanding a narrative icon is to look at the posture taken by the main characters. The Apostles sitting in community indicate their coming into a new understanding. They are digesting the significance of this new wisdom fire which they feel within, having received it from above.

Classic Icons of Pentecost have Mary the mother of Jesus placed at the very center of the icon with six disciples on either side. She is mentioned as having been present in the Biblical text. Whether Mary is included or not, most women imagine they were there with her and at the Baptism of Christ in the river Jordan as well as at the Last Supper. However, women have not been abundantly represented in the theology, image or text. Christians are taught to believe the Holy Spirit was poured out onto all people, male and female and all of creation.

In this icon, I have eliminated two of the disciples and the four “special” disciples, the ones in their priestly stoles typically adorned with giant crosses and holding their gospel books. I have substituted them for six women. This group of twelve are exceptional people who love; champions of faith who are remembered and whose earthly lives are considered instructive and worthy of imitation. They can perhaps be Salome, Bartholomew, Andrew, Luke, Mother Teresa, Mary Magdalene, Paul, Tabitha, Mark, Susana, James, and Martha sitting together in harmony. The Saint or recognizable person is not the point of the icon. Rather it illustrates our sitting together in relationship, in peace, and receiving the Holy Spirit. This group of twelve are one body and one mind in God; they sit comfortably with one another without debate as to who is best, better or right.

The icon presents Pentecost, not so much as a historical event but a spiritual reality that transcends history.  Pentecost was not a one-time event but is an ongoing reality flowing into our human history. Divine grace was manifested in the God-Man Jesus Christ, but at Pentecost divine grace is manifested in the Church, the mystical body of Christ and all of creation. The Church is not a mere human organization, but a sacrament for the world.

The World Waiting

At the bottom of classic Icons of Pentecost there would be a small arch over an old man, a lonely figure named ‘Kosmos.’ He is clothed in royal attire. He possesses the dignity which God bestowed at the beginning of creation. ‘ Kosmos’ is crowned with arms extended, holding a draped cloth containing scrolls representing the Apostolic teaching handed down through the twelve tribes of Israel.

Orthodoxy depicts this small man in the arch as defining the natural universe in its fallen state, in darkness, in isolation. The teachings handed to us by early theologians debated the coming of a time when all of creation would be redeemed. The Fall was a cosmic catastrophe. The natural environment suffered the consequences of Adam and Eve’s rebellion against their Creator. Through the Incarnation, the Creator God entered again into the material cosmos. Humanity wanted to play God and have control over creation by eating from the tree of knowledge. But God gave us Jesus who by his dying on the Cross Christ engaged the realities of sin and death again, and by his resurrection Christ defeated darkness. Here humanity would find “The Way” for the restoration of all things through His teachings and example.

For we know that the whole creation groans and labors with birth pangs together until now.  Not only that, but we also who have the first fruits of the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves, eagerly waiting for the adoption, the redemption of our body.  For we were saved in this hope, but hope that is seen is not hope; for why does one still hope for what he sees?  (Romans 8:22-25)

Kosmos is the Greek word for “world.”

One thousand years ago traditional iconograpghers and those viewing their work would not have known the concept of being on a planet. Pentecost filled the world with spirit, yet up until one hundred years ago humanity did not know the idea of a world. It has been a mere sixty years ago that we came to see ourselves from space. I have adapted the image of Kosmos and in its place positioned our planet Earth. We are entwined as a species, the caretakers of the rock we live on, the one that we have inherited from God. I would suggest that what unites these twelve believers is their connection to one another is their waiting for a new age. This yearning for redemption becomes an eager hope through faith in Christ and fellowship for living our vows as his disciples of love. We are at the summit of consciousness. In our current era, creation seems to be out of balance, and under enormous stress as a result of our human behavior. Can the planet continue to support humanity without fatigue? Maybe it is time to believe it is our responsibility to preserve and protect this great planet Earth without destroying it.

 

 

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Mary Jane Miller is a self-taught Byzantine style iconographer with over 28 years of experience. For the first 15 years she produced unique and unorthodox collections of sacred art and continues to have them exhibited in museums and churches in both the United States and Mexico. Miller writes luxuriously, blending historical content and personal insights to arrive at contemporary conclusions about faith. The author of four self-published books include Icon Painting Revealed, The Mary Collection, In light of Women, and The Stations. Miller has been published online and in publications such as Divine Temple Russian Orthodox Journal, Faith and Forum Magazine, Liturgy Today and Profiles of Catholicism. She teaches four courses annually, and 5 day immersion workshops throughout the US and Mexico. Website: www.sanmiguelicons.com and http://sacrediconretreat.com/



Categories: Academy, Activism, Art, Belief, Divine Feminine, Ecofeminism, Female Saints, Feminism, Feminism and Religion, General, God

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7 replies

  1. To respond to your last comment – it’s more than time – we are literally out of time.

    We don’t live on a rock; we live on a planet that is a living being.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Beautiful artwork! And a beautifully medieval post. But we are half-way through August, not in mid-June, so I’m confused about the timing of your post.

    Our Blessed Mother Earth is not a rock, though I guess that’s how astronomers might see her. But our world is filled with life and spirit, and thanks to MANkind’s selfishness–like poisoning her waters and air, driving her wild creatures nearly to extinction, overpopulating cities and lands with people who may starve, and ignoring the climate change that careless industrialization has led to–we are indeed running out of time and space. We’re not waiting for some invisible spirit “out there” to “descend” but for the people right here to wake up and bless us all, especially our children.

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  3. Wonderful art! And, this paragraph (to me) shows how religion (story and ritual) works itself out in human imagination: “The icon presents Pentecost, not so much as a historical event but a spiritual reality that transcends history. Pentecost was not a one-time event but is an ongoing reality flowing into our human history. Divine grace was manifested in the God-Man Jesus Christ, but at Pentecost divine grace is manifested in the Church, the mystical body of Christ and all of creation. The Church is not a mere human organization, but a sacrament for the world.”

    Your conclusion asks an important question: “In our current era, creation seems to be out of balance, and under enormous stress as a result of our human behavior. Can the planet continue to support humanity without fatigue? Maybe it is time to believe it is our responsibility to preserve and protect this great planet Earth without destroying it.”

    It’s not clear (to me) how the two paragraphs intersect, though. Can you shed some light?

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  4. Mary Jane, your art has a more magical and beautiful quality than the old icons. When I opened this post, before reading anything, the image made me think, I should go back and spend time with those icons again, I don’t remember them being so compelling and fascinating. Many thanks for your dedicated work. It is full of grace.

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  5. Yes, we need to profoundly deepen our understanding of what we call eco-spirituality. Our great love of nature has truly always been inherent in the human heart. It’s not something we had to learn mentally, but rather it was and is part of our awareness, our great caring and great love for nature, we experience that even as a child.

    Liked by 2 people

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